Sunday, April 11, 2010 | By: Zachary Bartels

Interview With Frank Turk

I am pleased (is "pleased" the right word?) to present to you the following interview with omnipresent reformed blogger, Frank Turk, in which we talk about his mysterioso, comics, and the fact that he is, indeed, mean. This interview is not as random as it seems; you see, my boy Ted Kluck used his not-unimpressive evangelical street cred to convince Turk to provide the foreword to our soon-to-be avaible book, Kinda Christianity. So, yeah, this is yet another grinding wheel in the hype machine that is now beginning to roll.

In the past, I've posted interviews in two parts, but it seems like part 2 always has about a third of the readers/commenters that part 1 has. So, this time, I am unfurling the entire thing in one rather lengthy piece.

A little background for the two people out there who are unfamilar with Frank Turk's work: he is probably best known for being one of the three twisted minds behind the Pyromaniacs weblog . He also posts at First Things, centuri0n.blogspot.com, and about a million other places. Oh, and he hates my blog template and seemingly won't rest until Dispatches is no longer "a brown mess."




ZB: Thanks for taking the time, Turk. I appreciate it. Let me just jump right in by stating the obvious: you are a man of mystery. You seem to run at least 65 well-known, well-trafficked blogs, you rub shoulders with the Reformed elites, and yet no one knows your whereabouts, your day job, or about your secret drinking. Are you, in fact, a legend? (Sub-question: do you regularly get from point A to point B on a horse?)

FT:Much of my persona is actually an urban myth. They say that Ashley Flores is living in my basement, that I'm about to disseminate all cell phone numbers to telemarketing firms in order to break the back of the wireless communication network globally, I've lauched a virus on Facebook and via Hallmark e-cards, I'm working for Michelle Obama, and I'm the one who forced Starbucks not to serve GIs who have been stationed in Iran and Afganistan. And I hate somebody this week -- I think it's Ingrid Schlueter.

Obviously, almost all of this is false.

I hate Starbucks (unless it's free, so that's the next Obamacare as far as I'm concerned), love GIs, I'm launching the new and improved CalvinistGadfly.com this summer if I can get my software to work (and there will be no viruses, but maybe some cookies)(those lemony ones the Girl Scouts sell), I have never met Michelle Obama, I fear wireless communications even though I walk around with a Borg implant in my ear, I don't want your cell number, and I think "Ashley" is a stripper's name and I can't understand why you'd name your daughter after a stripper. Sounds to me like you have her future all laid out already -- and not for the better.

My horse is a Nissan Altima my kids call "the Silver Bullet". Local law enforcement officials usually call it 47 in a 35. Dang it.


ZB: Okay, it's obvious you live in some sort of underground bunker or perhaps the mansion headquarters of a cult that you started in the mid-'90s. We'll leave that alone. But here's the thing: on facebook, you'll occasionally relate the contents of the day to come with some level of work-related stress. Ted Kluck has always thought of you managing a giant (like four-story) book store, while I think of you sitting at a loom in an all-glass cubicle high above a factory floor, churning out tapestries (I also imagine you living on a boat, but that's neither here nor there). Just tell me this: who's closer, me or Ted?

FT:Up until Christmas 2008, I owned a Christian bookstore which served its community admirably (but not very profitably). Since then I have been the spider in the center of a web which, because it is full of nano-technology and pure spite, churns out giant industrial machines which are used in the renewable energy sector for something only an engineer can explain adequately. I'm an English major, so my explanation is that we make the part that goes round and round, and we believe most of them will not fall off or down.

So in this case, Ted does not win, and your odd, delusional interpretation of what I really do inspires me.


ZB: Am I right in assuming that, if I were to keep pushing for more details about your life, this interview might end with a walk-off a la Robert Schuler on the White Horse Inn? That would be epic and spoken of for YEARS.

FT:You couldn't make me walk off. Do your worst. Just don't ask about my many wives or the training my children are going through and why it involves high doses of radiation, Red Bull, and small packages from the orient with an archane symbol on them. Or why I own so many Doombots.


ZB: Fine then, let's switch gears. How did you get started on PyroManiacs? And did you know it would be as huge as it is?

FT:I had lunch with Phil Johnson and he asked me. Of course it was going to be huge -- it has me and Phil and Dan in it. you can't put the three of us into anything that's not actually "huge" because we are, each, individually, huge. And by "huge" I mean "pants sizes above 40 waist."


ZB: Where did you get the monicker centuri0n?

FT:Back in the day (like, 1994 -- you were like 7 back then, right?), nobody used their real name on the internet. And I had just gotten saved. So I had to come up with a user name for my Macintosh internet service (what did they call it back then? It was actually consumed by AOL ...) using my blazing-fast 28.8 modem, and I liked that guy in Luke who could command an army of soldiers but couldn;t save his own servant's life who told Jesus, "If you say the word, my servant will be healed -- because I understand authority, and you have it."


ZB: Actually, in 1994, I was sixteen and running a corny Christian BBS called "The Lamb."

FT: Oh, I didn't know you were like that. Not that there's anything wrong with that.


ZB: Hreh. Does the zero [in centuri0n] have some theological significance or was "centurion" already taken?

FT:The "ZERO" is a nod to the primative 1337-spellers.


ZB: Your many blogs (particularly your work on Pyro), have a reputation for gravitating toward what some call "discernment ministry" (i.e. warning Christians about subtle and not-so-subtle errors within the visible church and without). Was that an intentional decision, or just kind of a groove that you found?

FT: Eh. I don't see it that way at all. I think getting too focussed on bad people and why they're so bad, and they will make your children bad, and there's only one generation standing between us and raw, rank secular religion makes us forget that Jesus is good. I have this post out there someplace that talks about how the Gospel is not something that really needs to be protected so much as sort of fired like a missile into sin and death, and we shouldn't be living in a bunker hoping the Gospel somehow survives if we only defend it to our deaths.

Some people are wrong -- the internet is full of them, and many of those people are on "my team" theologically and politically. Making one's whole life about those people is a waste of time. I'm more concerned with the people who don't know better, or who are confused, or who are somehow being indoctrinated by all kinds of kooks. Maybe "discernment ministries" would be better off talking about what they believe and what the consequences of those things are rather than how many times Rob Bell sticks his foot in his mouth.

You know: we get it. Now what? What if everyone stopped going to Rob Bell's church, and stopped buying Ann Lamott (sorry: I meant Donald Miller) books, and took all their PDL/PDC books back for a refund. Now what?

You think that Detroit downsizing is bad, you can't imagine the carnage that would ensue if the apologetics blogosphere suddenly had nothing to talk about.


ZB: I'm thinking about things like "Redneck Atheism" and book reviews you've done. Maybe it's more along the lines of apologetical equipping of the saints than the usually "caution: heretics ahead" type blogging.

FT:Yeah, fair enough. I get itchy with the label "discernment blogging". It's either too broad or filled with people I'd rather not be compared to.

The "redneck Atheism" thing is an interesting touchstone for the question becuase I see that as talking to people who, frankly, have started the discussion with their own little apologetic nerdy zeal. Nobody's getting drawn out of Christianity by the nutty ideas in the atheist top-10 list, but plenty of people are trying to close the conversation with that stuff, and I see it as useful (as they say at Between Two Worlds) to say, "hey -- if your logic there was a pair of pants, you'd be wearing yours on your head backwards with the fly down like the turkey in the Boynton children's board book. Oops!"


ZB: Holy crap, I love that book. When that turkey jumps into the pool fully clothed at the end...it always catches me off guard. And speaking of high art, who's repsonsible for all the cleverly photo-shopped stuff on TeamPyro?

FT:Phil is the king of teamPyro graphics, but I make one from time to time.


ZB: What about the art on centuri0n.blogspot.com? Is that your work?

FT:Most of the stuff at centuri0n is scanned -- about 10% are my own work.


ZB: Of course, anyone who's been to your blog knows of your proclivity for comic book art. From whence did this interest spring, and what has been your level of involvement in that scene?

FT:You have no idea how chained-up to comics I am. When I was a kid, on sundays my parents would grocery shop, and next door to the grocer was this drug store -- I know, it's like 100 years ago when the grocer and the druge store were two different businesses. In the drug store there was this wire rack, and one day I guess my dad thought it would be fine for me to sit there and read comics. I remember clearly it was Avengers #158.

I bought is for 30 cents, can you imagine that? You can't buy an on-line greeting card for 30 cents. How did those guys eat?

Anyway, 35 years later I have this absurd stack of boxes in my garage full of comics, most of which I will not let my kids read because they are evil (the books, not the kids), but we make a monthly pilgrimage to the local comic book retailer (because fat guys with no lives and no chance of every having a girl friend gotta eat, too)(maybe they could lay off a donut or something, but you see what I'm sayin') and we indulge in the world of primary colors and narrative art and "WA-BAMM" and "POING!". My youngest actually coined a great phrase -- "I'll smack you to Ala-WaBAM-a!" So I'm very proud.

I actually wrote an unpublished comic with my youngest brother. I just wrote a description of it and deleted it because there's a good reason it's unpublished. Anyway, comics rock, and if more reformed people read comics they would probably implode because the nexus of geekery that would develop in their brains between theology and glossy pictures of genetic freaks with suggestive costumes would undoubtedly cause some kind of cerebral infarction.


ZB: I'm only in my 30s and I used to buy comics from a wire rack in a pharmacy. They were 75 cent then, though. (I too have hundreds of them--combined value of about $22). I am officially intrigued by your comic book. Would you re-consider letting us in on the synopsis?

FT:{sigh} It's a full-blown universe. I'm not sure I can summarize it without having your eyes roll up in your head. It's about corporate espionage, government corruption, libertarian values, hot rich girls, high-tech weapons, and family vendettas. The main character is Daniel Decker, AKA WildCard. His mentor in John Adams Calvin, billionaire industrialist. His sidekick is an AI andoid called "Shyster", and he works with a guy they call "the Grappler" who's an ex-pro wrestler with a PhD in philosophy.

I really can't say more without dimming the lights and running the projector.


ZB: I can tell you're getting uncomfortable, so let me stay on this subject... so, this is an actual, finished, drawn, inked, and lettered comic, sitting somewhere collecting dust?

FT:It's sort of a novella. I can draw most of the characters still. Don't make me pencil.


ZB: What is your opinion of Christian comics in general?

FT:There are Christian comics? You mean like Tomo? What's Christian about that? I love the Ninja raccoon thing, though. That's awesome.

Did you know that Brian Augustine is a Christian? Yeah -- met him at a CBA show years ago, and he was "promoting" (right next to the guy with 1000 flavors of annointing oil) a new line of high-quality Christian comics. I felt bad for him -- becuase I was the only one there impressed that they had gotten Brian Augustine -- the guy who made the Flash cool in the early 90's -- to do Christian comics. They had no idea what they were dealing with -- and the books showed it. He was obviously hemmed in by the CBA hacks who make everything holy and stupid and somehow soul-numbing -- it's like anti-presbyterianism. They baptize it and instantly it sucks right to hell.

So you can imagine what I think about Christian comics.


ZB: There are lots of "Christian titles" that have spanned about three issues before they go the way of all flesh (David's Mighty Men, Archangels, Dust, etc.). And who can overlook the Christian versions of Archie, Dennis the Menace, etc? And of course, the King Kong of Christian Comics: Jack Freaking Chick (yeah, I'm a big-time JFC collector).

FT:Meh. Somebody who's a decent writer and a Christian will get his hands on Captain America one day and THEN there will have been a truly-Christian comic. Until then, the rest of that stuff is embarassing.

ZB: Ouch. That's a good segue to my next topic: you're often accused of being mean, uncharitable, harsh, etc.

FT:I am mean. Like a snake-killing ferret.


ZB: Mmm. I bring this up not to rub salt in your wounds, but because my own blog (in which I don't pull punches when wolves come prowling) has brought on similar charges, and Kinda Christianity is sure to bring on even more (as you predicted in the foreword). How do you deal with the charge (either blasted at all three of you Pyro guys or at you individually) that you are not being Christian when you don't dance around the issue?

FT:I laugh. I like to laugh, so I laugh.

This complaint comes from people who are willing to call most Christians hard-hearted, who think those who take Scripture literally are ignorant, who see sex outside of marriage as OK in spite of things like the consequential illegitimacy rate and the real people that harms, and who are themselves somewhat smug and sarcastic.

So I laugh. No sense arguing with people who are that self-ignorant.


ZB: Makes sense. Let's talk about labels for a minute. Dan Phillips calls himself a "CalviDispieBaptoGelical." What labels do you wear? (Surely it would be too cliched for you to say "I'm not in to labels.")

FT:Christocentric, people-loving glutton for punishment who admires post-mil enthusiasm for the power of the Gospel and a-mil patience for holiness and church life.


ZB: Nice. Assuming you someday have "a legeacy," is that what you'd want to be remembered as? If not, what would be your ideal legacy?

FT:I believe the children are our future. teach them well and let them lead the way. Show them all the beauty they possess inside.

Seriously, though -- if we can be completely serious in this interview for about 30 seconds -- Piper did a talk at San Luis Abispo a couple of years ago, and the slogan for that talk was this:


The greatest cause in the world is joyfully rescuing people from hell, meeting their earthly needs, making them glad in God, and doing that with a kind and serious pleasure that makes CHRIST look like the treasure He is.
That'd be a pretty cool legacy.

ZB: I doubt we could end this interview on a better note than that.

FT:The only better ending would be if Rick Warren could somehow say the benediction and the Jonas Bros sing the recessional.

23 reader comments:

Frank Turk said...

I can't believe I'm the first to comment on this post.

Do other people read this blog?

Coram Deo said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Coram Deo said...

I read it too, Frank.

Although it looks like I'm only the second. Maybe this isn't the meta for your big announcement about the grand opening of The centuri0n Fan Club.

I read your comment over at Whitehorse Inn today, but I got there after they closed the comments. In retrospect I'm thankful for that bit of providence.

The Augustinian order, monastic asceticism, and Rick Warren being used by God to bring people to the true gospel in only five, count 'em, five paragraphs.

Not too shabby.

In Christ,
CD

P.S. - DebateBlog is languishing helplessly. Throw a dog a bone once in awhile...

Erin said...

GREAT interview. Very entertaining. (Aside: Zach's wife reads it.) :)

Steph Pavlov Eckerd said...

I think both of you are just as much of a crack up as the other...I did get a good laugh out of that, that's for sure.

Watcher's Lamp said...

Maybe "discernment ministries" would be better off talking about what they believe...

You know: we get it. Now what? What if everyone stopped going to Rob Bell's church, and stopped buying Ann Lamott (sorry: I meant Donald Miller) books, and took all their PDL/PDC books back for a refund. Now what?

With all due respect

If we "get it", why aren't more evangelicals calling men like Rob Bell & Rick Warren out for the sake of the Gospel?

Why is confusion endorsed and not refuted?

Have we forgotten that there is a battle raging?

Jim

ZSB said...

Jim,

You make a point, but I think Frank was just saying that he's not called to that particular minstry. Rick Warren et al ARE being called out. Podcasts of http://www.fightingforthefaith.com are proof of that! Let's all pray that the church returns to the CROSS and the GOSPEL and leaves behind feel-good, felt-needs, me-centered religiosity... (I don't know Turk super-well, but well enough to know that's where his heart is as well.)

God bless you and your ministry,
-Zach

Frank Turk said...

Thanks Zach -- I think you're exactly right.

Now, here's the thing: I suspect that while the Kinda' Christians will never lead the world to Christ (because they don't really think the world needs Christ), our friends who only post about the thinks they hate about Kinda Christians never really lead anyone to Christ either -- because they think the Gospel is in danger and unless people have an instantaneous and complete revelation of the Gospel in they systematic terms they would personally use, those people are breaking the Gospel.

Robert Schuller never broke the Gospel: he just ignored it. Rob Bell doesn't break the Gospel: he neglects it.

And just for the record, this is how one tells that truth and still tells people about Jesus. Ranting about "heretics" who have somehow done Jesus wrong may have a place, but it is only in a context where the actual Jesus is exalted and the Good News of him is proclaimed. You know: Jesus is proclaimed. And then Jesus is proclaimed.

If you can find three posts on any "discernment blog" which proclaim the truth of Jesus Christ that clearly all the while contrasting it with some evangelical dog's breakfast, then you can start running me and mine into the ground for any reason.

I welcome the criticism of people who spend their spiritual energy on not-the-Gospel. What I do, and have done, and will do with the platform God has given me speaks for itself and distances itself from them with long strides.

Coram Deo said...

Frank said:
"If you can find three posts on any "discernment blog" which proclaim the truth of Jesus Christ that clearly all the while contrasting it with some evangelical dog's breakfast, then you can start running me and mine into the ground for any reason."

Is that an open throwdown, or is the challenge intended only for Zach?

Because if it's open to all comers then I'll take you up on that offer, Frank. And I'll up the ante: you can pick the blog or blogs.

But if you're feeling sheepish, and would rather not "name names", then I can use my own "discernment" to select some "discernment blogs". As an aside, I wonder what meaning those "quotation marks" in your original comment above are supposed to convey?

Are we on?

In Christ,
CD

P.S. you said: I welcome the criticism of people who spend their spiritual energy on not-the-Gospel. What I do, and have done, and will do with the platform God has given me speaks for itself and distances itself from them with long strides.

Wow! God is fortunate to have someone of your high standards and character on board with Him. He must be very grateful. Have you read C.J. Mahaney's book entitled Humility: True Greatness?

Frank Turk said...

CD--

There is a massive difference between Alpha-Omega Ministries (as one example; a group of men blogging under the spiritual guidance of an elder in a local church who -regularly- proclaim Jesus Christ) and the people I am talking about in my comments here. That distinction is regularly lost in this discussion, so feel free to do what you think you are setting out to do as long as you keep in mind that I am not throwing the baby out with the bath water.

As to the PS, is it really so disturbing or actually unhumble to admit that somehow I have fairly-large platform to say what I have to say, and that I didn't hard-scrabble it together, but rather God has given it and I have used it well?

Feel free to help me understand the problem as you see it there. It will be enlightening to get advice from a guy who names himself 'coram deo' regarding humility.

ZSB said...

I suppose some bloggers would be trying to lace on their "moderator of my comments section" boots and heading out to maintain civility. But all I can think about is how Turk just threw out "Kinda Christians" like it was already an established term. FAME AND FORTUNE, HERE I COME!! [book should be on Amazon in about a week, BTW]

So, anyway, let's try to remember that we all agree about emergent nonsense, seeker-scratching nonsense, etc. My own challenge would be: find me five discernment bloggers who don't look up to TeamPyro as a model of incredible quality blogging...

PyroManiacs Link said...

Frank Turk addresses this issue here:

http://teampyro.blogspot.com/2010/04/comma-delimited.html

Coram Deo said...

Frank said: There is a massive difference between Alpha-Omega Ministries (as one example; a group of men blogging under the spiritual guidance of an elder in a local church who -regularly- proclaim Jesus Christ) and the people I am talking about in my comments here.

Okay so aomin is off the table, check. It would seem that leaves Zach's readers a bit clearer about the people you're not "talking about in [your] comments here".

So we have at least one negative case; is it then up to those who'd like to take up your challenge to figure out who the quote-unquote "discernment ministries" are who - at least in your mind -serve no purpose?

As you can probably appreciate, your challenge becomes much more difficult when there are no goalposts, or else when you move them to suit your mood.

Frank said: "That distinction is regularly lost in this discussion, so feel free to do what you think you are setting out to do as long as you keep in mind that I am not throwing the baby out with the bath water."

Hey, foul on the play, coach! I'm only offering to take up the challenge that you set forth here. Are you revoking your offer?

Frank said: "As to the PS, is it really so disturbing or actually unhumble to admit that somehow I have fairly-large platform to say what I have to say, and that I didn't hard-scrabble it together, but rather God has given it and I have used it well?"

I just couldn't help being impressed by the wording of your comment. You seemed to be awfully thankful that you weren't like the sinners and tax collectors over at the "discernment blogs" - whoever they may be.

Frank said: "Feel free to help me understand the problem as you see it there. It will be enlightening to get advice from a guy who names himself 'coram deo' regarding humility."

Nice diversionary tactic, but Mahaney wrote the book, not me. Maybe you have a dusty unread copy laying around from your Christian bookstore days?

Since you brought it up, regarding the "fairly-large platform" that God gave you - and this is just a suggestion - you might reflect on your [ab]use of it as a personal Isengard from whence you can hurl your thunderbolts of glib and gratuitous ad hom at people who - at last presumably - you would claim as brothers and sisters in Christ. From what I can tell this appears to be at least part of your gripe with the watchbloggers, no?

Mote, meet log.

Anyway, if you're serious about the challenge let me know and I'll serve you, otherwise I'll assume you were just blowing smoke, and leave it at that.

ZSB,

No need to worry about civility or "tone", Frank's a big boy.

In Christ,
CD

Frank Turk said...

CD --

Thanks for putting so many words in my mouth. They taste great.

Frank Turk said...

A more-thorough response to our faceless friend can be found here.

chamblee54 said...

Scent is right about one thing. You should get a template for your blog that does not use up half the page with brown stuff. I recommend "herbert".
In the spirit of a broken clock being right twice a day, Scent told me about GIMP, which now occupies a significant portion of my time.
As for his opinions about Jesus, the bible, and life after death...If you can't say anything good about someone, don't say anything at all.
As for the anonymous blogger thing, Mr. Turk might consider printing a photograph of himself. The twitching eyebrow is optional.
On that note, if you want to see what I am doing, go to chamblee 54 any old time. I have not been excessively honest about Jesus worship religion since Easter.

Coram Deo said...

Frank,

Based on the contents of the screeching screed you linked above I'd say you managed to sweep away any doubts that may have lingered in the minds of Zach's readers as to the breadth of your arrogance, and the depth of your insolence.

In a strange way what you did was actually a kind service to the fair minded observer; thank you for being so transparent.

To be frank (pun intended), it was even instructive for me, and I already knew something of your sinful tendency towards childishness, petulance, and haughtiness.

In Christ,
CD

ZSB said...

Everyone: Blog Template stays. You're all just uncomfortable with it because the background looks like the screen in a confessional and you all have TONS of unconfessed sin... Besides, I don't want a "template"--then other people's blogs would look more or less just like mine. It may be kinda ugly, but Dispatches is 100% original Pastor Zach! :D

Something I just realized...

Coram Deo on April 11, 10:31 PM: "Not too shabby...DebateBlog is languishing helplessly. Throw a dog a bone once in awhile..."

Kind, familiar, warm tone to his comments to Turk, having read the interview.

Coram Deo on April 13, 12:25 AM:"Wow! God is fortunate to have someone of your high standards and character on board with Him. He must be very grateful."

Sarcastic, angry, (admittedly, not a unilateral move on C.D.'s part), but night and day compared to his previous comment.

All I'm saying is: what changed, other than the discernment blog network decided to throw a good man under the bus because he dared to question the party line or suggest that we could improve on it...

I pull out my gun if I hear someone outside my house late at night too. But when I see that it's a friend, even if he's borrowing my lawnmower without asking, I put the gun away.

Mita said...

FRANK TURK IS WRONG... I think the brown color of your blog is manly.

Coram Deo said...

Zach,

Don't change your blog template. My first vehicle was a fecal brown, beat down old pick-up truck.

Brown is also the color of rich dirt, and people pay good money for rich dirt.

You quoted me then said: Sarcastic, angry, (admittedly, not a unilateral move on C.D.'s part), but night and day compared to his previous comment.

It's always difficult to gauge tone on the 'net, but trust me when I tell you that I wasn't (and I'm still not) angry at or with Cent.

Critical? Yes.

Biting? Probably, yes.

Sarcastic? Arguably.

Angry? Nah.

One of the funny things about Frank (funny strange, not funny ha-ha) is that he alleges that he's open to criticism, and even invites it - as you can see in his comments above - but he doesn't deal well with it.

C'est la vie.

But the truly strange part is that I actually like Frank, I really do (as much as you can "like" someone you don't actually know personally).

Maybe it would be more accurate to say I like his writing; although his tactics are frequently deplorable, and his conclusions are sometimes illogical and irrational.

Frank sort of reminds me of the crazy uncle that we all have who knows a ton of stuff (mostly useless but interesting miscellaney and such), and who's actually good at a few things - like grilling killer brats for example - but who also thinks he knows way more than he actually does, and so he lets all the complements about his killer brats go to his head to the point that he's insufferable when after the cook out he sits around opining about theoretical physics and quantum mechanics (even though he barely graduated high school) as all the while he picks his teeth with a toenail that he freshly chewed off his own foot to the utter horror and nausea of the rest of the family, and the other various and sundry invited guests.

Does that even make sense?

Anyway, good luck with your new book, but always keep your eyes on Christ and don't let the specter of success go to your head in the event that God chooses to give you a fairly large platform.

Thanks for being a good sport and allowing a bit of sparring in your thread. I won't take up any more of your combox space.

In Christ,
CD

Andy Dollahite said...

Enjoyed the original interview greatly, as well as the discussion that followed.

One small (and admittedly trite) pet peeve, the town Frank refers to at the end is San Luis Obispo. Since I lived there for six years, I love to see it spelled correctly.

Looking forward to your book as well. Cheers.

Frank Turk said...

I totally am the crazy uncle of the 'discernment blogosphere'. That's the nicest thing a discernment blogger has ever said about me.

As to not receiving criticism well, I don' t receive rocks thrown through my front window with notes tied to them very well, either. But, it seems to me that there's really no way to frame my response to CD's comments as 'crazy uncle' unless it seems right to either not respond at all, or to ignore that broad errors of CD's comments and just post a "no I ain't" and leave it at that. My response there was to the complaint, not to the man, and the complaint deserved addressing - but does not deserve to be treated as some well- considered piece of brotherly admonition because it is extremely lite on facts and very heavy on generalization.

Seacrestout.

dac said...

I admire post-mil enthusiasm for the power of the Gospel and a-mil patience for holiness and church life.

That is a interesting observation